UMD School of Public Health Researchers Develop TreadSense Treadmill

UMD School of Public Health Researchers Develop TreadSense Treadmill

Kinesiology researchers at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health have developed a treadmill named TreadSense, which may become the next big rehabilitation technology.

TreadSense aims to keep people active and independent longer, especially focusing on people with balance disorders, Parkinson’s disease, stroke survivors and the elderly. Walking is when falls are most likely to occur, so improving posture and balance will work preventatively against injuries. The annual cost of fall injuries is expected to be over $50 billion by 2020, whereas the costs of TreadSense are minimal.

The treadmill uses cameras that record the walker’s movement. These recordings are then sent to a computer that translates the images to give feedback to users about ways to improve their posture and balance during walking.

Lead researcher, Professor John Jeka, predicts that these machines will be regularly implemented into every health club within twenty years.

The machine is already being incorporated into patients’ treatment plans at Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland. Patients have reported seeing significant improvement after only a short period of use. A future clinical trial is being planned for a retirement community in Mitchellville, Maryland, funded by the National Institutes of Health.

For more information, visit: http://issuu.com/umaryland/docs/terp_f2012_wclassnotes?mode=window&pageNumber=14

October 15, 2012


Prev   Next

Current Headlines

Rejoining the Paris Accord: Scholars Respond

Waging War on Metastatic Cancer

Protected Areas Vulnerable to Growing Emphasis on Food Security

Taken to Extremes: START Center's Jensen on Fringe Politics

Why Brands Are Rethinking Their Political Giving

Huang, Stroka Labs Collaborate to Advance Understanding of Blood-Brain Barrier

New Technique Explores African American Willingness to Participate in Genomics Research through Storytelling

Read My Lips! Facial Cues Help Toddlers with Autism Better Comprehend Speech in Noise, UMD Research Shows

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar

Additional Resources

UM Newsdesk

Faculty Experts

Connect

social iconstwitterlinkedinrssYouTube
Division of Research
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-1541
© Copyright 2017 University of Maryland

Did You Know

UMD is a member of the Association of American Universities, comprised of 61 leading research universities in the U.S. & Canada.